Interest in the benefits of lupin grows

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Nutrition

Interest in the benefits of lupin is growing as manufacturers experiment with new sources of vegetable protein, according to a leading manufacturer...

Interest in the benefits of lupin is growing as manufacturers experiment with new sources of vegetable protein, according to a leading manufacturer of lupin-based ingredients.

Few realised that lupin seeds contained as much protein as soy but twice the fibre, said Claudie Augereau, sales and product manager at French sweet white lupin products specialist Lup'Ingredients. She added: "Lupin flour has at least 40% protein, 31% fibres, 10% sugars, 10% lipids and lots of micronutrients. It's still a niche market, but we are seeing growing interest in areas like gluten-free bakery.

"Lupin ingredients can be used to reduce butter [as it has a buttery taste], add protein and replace emulsifiers such as soy lecithin, egg yolk or additives such as mono and diglycerides of fatty acids in cakes, pastries and mayonnaise. It's also a good taste enhancer in salty, nutty or buttery foods because of its high glutamic acid content, and it has a clean-label."

The fatty acid profile of lupin seeds was also good, with 67% monounsaturates, 19% polyunsaturates and just 14% saturates, she said. Their fibre content, water retention and fat-binding qualities also helped to improve texture in biscuits and batter mixes, while their natural antioxidants could help boost the shelf-life of some products, she added.

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