Obesity Debate

Obesity will not be solved by reformulation alone

Reformulation ‘won’t solve obesity’

By Laurence Gibbons

Reformulation is not the sole solution to obesity, as health-conscious consumers could be increasing their calorie consumption by choosing low-sugar or low-fat products, according to research from AB Sugar.

Scottish consumers need to up their consumption of fruit and vegetables

Reaction: Scotland’s NDNS results

Scotland’s diabetes ‘time bomb’

By Nicholas Robinson

Scotland’s ageing and increasingly overweight population is facing a “diabetes time bomb”, which must be a focus of the Scottish government.

The Scots are drinking more alcohol and sugary drinks than UK average

Snapshot: Scotland’s NDNS results

Scots eat poorer diet compared with UK average

By Nicholas Robinson

Scottish consumers drink more alcohol, eat fewer fruits and vegetables and drink more sugary drinks than the rest of the UK, according to Scotland’s National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) results.

Home-cooked meals are not always the healthiest - new research

Home-cooked not always best

By Nicholas Robinson

Home-cooked meals may not be the healthiest or cheapest option for consumers, as food businesses continue to respond to health and price concerns by adapting their recipes, according to new research.

Researchers are calling for sugar to represent no more than 3% of total dietary energy intake

Sugar not the sole cause of obesity: AB Sugar

By Rick Pendrous

British Sugar owner AB Sugar is fighting back against anti-sugar campaigners with the launch of a campaign informing people about sugar’s role in a healthy balanced diet.

Lower saturated fats through rapeseed gene

Lower saturated fats in new rapeseed strain

By Nicholas Robinson

Determined food businesses working to lower fat content could benefit from a new strain of rapeseed that produces oil with lower than usual levels of saturated fat.

Clare Cheney, Director general, Provision Trade Federation

Walking has a bigger role in the obesity war

By Clare Cheney

Professor Mike Lean of Glasgow University described as “absolute nonsense” Christopher Snowdon’s report from the Institute of Economic Affairs ‘The Fat Lie’, which claimed that a lack of exercise, rather than overeating, was behind obesity.

Sugar is not the primary cause for the rise in obesity, according to Snowdon

Obesity caused mainly by inactivity, not sugar

By Laurence Gibbons

The rise in obesity in the UK has been primarily caused by a decline in physical activity, not by increased calorie and sugar consumption, according to the Institute of Economic Affairs.

The debate over sugar has turned people off baking

Sugar debate halts baking’s popularity

By Laurence Gibbons

Demand for baking ingredients and kits is set to crumble as health conscious consumers look to avoid sugar and spend less time in the home, according to a report by Mintel.

Beware the food 'Taliban': Rick Pendrous, editor, Food Manufacture

Beware the views of Britain’s ‘food Taliban’

By Rick Pendrous

Nutrition is not a precise science. Most studies on the effects of human dietary intake have to take account of potentially confounding factors, since it is rarely possible to control what people eat in extended studies as it might with lab rats.

Salt pledge pushes innovation

Salt cutting trend drives research

By Nicholas Robinson

Soy sauce can be used to reduce the salt content of manufactured foods by more than 30%, according to recent research from the Dutch university Wageningen’s UR Food and Biobased Research centre.

Sugar can be reduced by using clever application technologies

Four sugar reduction solutions

By Rod Addy

Food manufacturers could slash sugar content in products by applying four technologies to use sugar differently, according to Leatherhead Food Research’s head of ingredients and product innovation Dr Wayne Morley.

A backlash against stevia in the US led Coca-Cola to do a U-turn on its Vitawater recipe

Coca-Cola Company won’t ditch stevia in the UK

By Nicholas Robinson

Sugar reduction campaigners have praised the Coca-Cola Company’s (CCC’s) refusal to drop the natural sweetener stevia in its Glaceau Vitaminwater in the UK, as it has done in the US.