Sharapova ditches name change stunt to promote sweets

By Mike Stones

- Last updated on GMT

What's in a name - apart from millions of dollars of free publicity? Sharapova has abandoned plans to change her name to Sugarpova for the US Grand Slam tennis Open tournament
What's in a name - apart from millions of dollars of free publicity? Sharapova has abandoned plans to change her name to Sugarpova for the US Grand Slam tennis Open tournament
Tennis star Maria Sharapova has ditched plans to change her name to Sugarpova – in a bid to promote her confectionery firm of the same name in advance of the US Open tennis Grand Slam tournament.

The globe’s richest female athlete, Sharapova lodged an enquiry with the Supreme Court of Florida – her home state – over a quickie name change. She had planned to revert to her real name after the tournament ended.

But, in a last-minute change of heart, Sharapova decided to abandon the plan.

“We ultimately decided against it”,​ said her agent Max Eisenbud. “Maria has pushed her team to do fun, out-of-the-box-type things to get the word out about Sugarpova … But at the end of the day, we would have to change all her identification, she has to travel to Japan and China right after the tournament and it was going to be very difficult.”

‘Fun, out-of-the-box-type things’

The 26-year-old Russian recently launched the Sugarpova brand​ in the UK, after launches in the US and other countries last year.

The confectionery range included a variety of sugary and sour confectionery in shapes such as tennis balls and lips. The 12-flavour range boasts brands such as: Flirty, Smitten Sour and Splashy.

BBC Radio 4’s Today​ programme reported this morning (August 22) that Sharapova had pulled out of the US open. This was due “not to a sweet tooth but a pulled shoulder muscle”​, quipped the presenter.

The US Open begins on Monday and runs until September 9.

Sharapova won the Grand Slam seven years ago.

 

Related news

Show more

Follow us

Featured Events

View more

Products

View more

Webinars