Thinner, harder steel reduces can costs

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Polyethylene terephthalate

Tate & Lyle has tweaked the design of its iconic Golden Syrup cans in a move that will enable it to further reduce packaging costs. By using...

Tate & Lyle has tweaked the design of its iconic Golden Syrup cans in a move that will enable it to further reduce packaging costs.

By using stronger, thinner steel, the firm had already halved the weight of steel it used in the cans in recent years, said Lyle's factory manager Dr Ian Clark. By flattening the top of the cans and shifting the weight from the caps to the perimeter when they are palletised, the firm should be able to reduce the thickness of the tin-plate used in the body of the cans by a further 15% this year, he said.

Golden Syrup sales had grown strongly in recent years driven by new packaging formats and co-branding deals, said Clark. "Overall, I'd say this plant has seen about 20% growth in the last five years, which is amazing as it is such an established brand."

As more volume shifted to polyethylene terephthalate squeezy bottles, fully automating the packing operation for these products was also being considered, he added: "Tray loading for the can lines is fully automated, but the bottle lines are semi-automated, so there are opportunities to explore automatic tray loaders and bottle sorters as well as bottle blow moulders."

Follow us

Products

View more

Webinars

PRODUCTS & SERVICES